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University of Minnesota

Kathryn A. Martin Library

Archival Sources on Anishinaabe, Ojibwe and Other Indigenous People at the UMD Archives

A guide to materials created by or about Anishinaabe, Ojibwe and other Indigenous people in the University of Minnesota Duluth Archives

Oral History Interviews

To request access to any of the audio files or transcripts that are not available online,  please contact the UMD Archives at libarchives@d.umn.edu or (218) 726-8526.

Waasa Inaabidaa Video Interviews and Transcripts

These video interviews and transcripts are available online at the links below. They were conducted for the production of a six-part public television documentary about the history and culture of Anishinaabe Ojibwe people titled Waasa Inaabida: We Look In All Directions that aired in 2001. These interviews are part of the Norrgard Anishinaabe Collection Waasa Inaabidaa Archives. The documentary is available to stream on WDSE's website

Boundary Changes on the Fond du Lac Reservation Oral History Interviews

In 1978 and 1979 historian Barbara Sommer interviewed residents of the Fond du Lac Reservation in Minnesota. The participants discussed and defined changes in the boundary of the Fond du Lac Reservation, MN. They also identified some changes in land use that occurred on the reservation and identified historic sites. The interviews include some spoken Ojibwe words and place names.

Other Individual Interviews

The University of Minnesota Duluth’s Land Acknowledgment

We collectively acknowledge that the University of Minnesota Duluth is located on the traditional, ancestral, and contemporary lands of Indigenous people. The University resides on land that was cared for and called home by the Ojibwe people, before them the Dakota and Northern Cheyenne people, and other Native peoples from time immemorial. Ceded by the Ojibwe in an 1854 treaty, this land holds great historical, spiritual, and personal significance for its original stewards, the Native nations and peoples of this region. We recognize and continually support and advocate for the sovereignty of the Native nations in this territory and beyond. By offering this land acknowledgment, we affirm tribal sovereignty and will work to hold the University of Minnesota Duluth accountable to American Indian peoples and nations. For more information click here.

Contact Us:

Email: libarchives@d.umn.edu

Phone: (218) 726-8526

Location: Kathryn A. Martin Library
Library Annex 202 (see map)